Publications

The Akademie der Künste publishes its own publications in connection with exhibitions and special events, as well as new acquisitions in the archives. These include exhibition catalogues, symposia documentation, monographs on individual artists, as well as publications on thematic main focuses and on selected archival collections.

Our publications can be ordered by phone or email, and you can visit our bookstore on Hanseatenweg in Berlin, which has access to all of the Akademie der Künste’s available books and antiquarian rarities.

 

Sinn und Form

Every two months, the Akademie der Künste also issues the “Sinn und Form” (Purpose and Form) journal.

Founded in 1949 by Johannes R. Becher and Paul Wiegler, the cultural magazine Sinn und Form (Purpose and Form), published by the Akademie der Künste, is one of the most influential of its kind in Germany. Originally addressed to a literary audience in particular, the journal today is also a venue for philosophical, aesthetic, and social issues, for the meeting of art and science, poetry and anthropology, and is thus a key publication for many Academy members. The ambitious programme has an international focus and comprises selected letters and conversations, essays, poems, and narratives. Findings from the extensive Academy Archive continue to be presented.

Current Publications

To the online edition: https://issuu.com/journalderkuenste

Journal der Künste 9 with the following contributions:carte blanche for Klaus Staeck, insights into The Walk by Jochen Gerz, Durs Grünbein and Matthias Weichelt in conversation on the occasion of the 70th anniversary of Sinn und Form, Wilfried Wang on Mythos Bauhaus, the radio play manuscript for Der Rechtsruck by Georg Seeßlen, Wolfgang Kaleck on (Post-)Colonial Injustice and legal Interventions. From the archives: Otto von Bismarck's honorary membership certificate as a new acquisition, Hanns Eisler scores as finds, and much more.

To order the print edition: info@adk.de

The Triadic Ballet by Oskar Schlemmer is one of the most unusual stage works of the 20th century. The documentation for the work describes the development of the costumes from the premiere in 1922 to the reconstruction by dancer and choreographer Gerhard Bohner in 1977, to their appearance within present-day triadic space. One hundred years of history that led to extraordinary success, despite the historical obstacles.

In 1996 the British supermarket chain Tesco took over "Máj", an old-fashioned department store in Prague. In 2009 it was renamed "My". Although both words are pronounced the same, the new name nevertheless opened another field of association. In English "my" refers to an individual; in Czech it means "we". Starting out from this semantic differentiation, Stephanie Kiwitt (Ellen Auerbach Fellow 2016), set off on a photographic search for clues in the streets of Prague.

Relying on materials from international archives, the author documents what "normal" citizens actually did, endorsed and saw. The images and eyewitness accounts reveal far-reaching complicity among perpetrators and followers: here the destructive rage and triumphant jeers of an unbridled mob; there the cowardly curiosity of onlookers. This publication unmistakably shows how 9 November 1938 became the testing ground and starting point of the Holocaust – right before everyone's eyes.

Excerpts from the unpublished diaries illuminate the artistic selfunderstanding and personal thoughts of the young Wieland Förster from his time as a master student to membership at the Deutsche Akademie der Künste (GDR). A document on walking with one's head held high in difficult times. The excerpts are supplemented by an interview with the artist, an essay by Hannes Schwenger and a contribution from Michael Krejsa on the Wieland Förster Archive.