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Katja Lange-Müller opens the third edition of the Journal der Künste with thoughts on literature and writing, followed by Jutta Brückner’s commitment to work against "unconscious bias". With essays by Nikita Dhawan, and from the Akademie archives, the Akademie’s upcoming main focus – on the subject of colonialism – is being prepared. Christina Kubisch contributes an artistic analysis of silence, while Annett Busch and Tobias Hering lead tours in the exhibition on Danièle Huillet and Jean-Marie Straub. Jeanine Meerapfel talks with Rainer Esser, CEO of ZEIT Verlagsgruppe, and so much more.

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By presenting this award to Katharina Sieverding the Akademie der Künste is honouring a German artist, who was a pioneer in an age of large-scale photo art in the 1960s. The jury, made up of the Akademie members Jochen Gerz, Karin Sander and Klaus Staeck, places particular emphasis on the fact that Katharina Sieverding poses fundamental questions about artistic, political and social conditions with regard to production processes and the reception of art. A catalogue is accompanying the exhibition (beginning 12 July) of the prizewinner of the Käthe-Kollwitz-Preis, including a text by art critic and curator Hans-Jürgen Hafner.

Access to the online issue: https://issuu.com/journalderkuenste

Debuting at the start of 2017, the new Journal der Künste will continue to be published four times a year. The free magazine provides information in German about the Akademie der Künste’s main events, publishes cultural-political contributions, introduces planned projects, and shows newly discovered objects from the archives. It is the Akademie's artistic and cultural-political thinking space. Edition 2/17 includes essays by Chantal Mouffe, Emin Alper, Gerhard Pfennig, Kathrin Röggla, Mark Lammert, et al.

Please order the printed form here: info@adk.de

This richly illustrated book to accompany the exhibition presents for the first time the main sketches, designs, models and projects from the oeuvre of an architect who, above all, is globally recognised as a seminal figure in Protestant church architecture. It documents the phases and diversity of his development from his first buildings in Imperial Germany to visions and projects as expressionism gave way to Neue Sachlichkeit in the Weimar Republic and his commitment to a postwar modernism which, through an imaginative yet restrained approach, significantly influenced the architecture of postwar Germany.

The architecture fellows Felix Lüdicke and Theresa Schütz created a temporary action and meeting place in the Berlin Hansaviertel with their intervention in public space. They included artists, residents, and passers-by. The publication documents their artistic work in the context of the 2015 Junge Akademie programme, which was also a contribution to the exhibition "Demo:Polis – The Right to Public Space" (2016). Essays by Michael Bräuer, Nele Hertling, Christian Schneegass, et al.

The prize is only open to women visual artists over the age of 40. The exhibition catalogue not only includes work by the prize winner Beate Passow but also by 19 other selected women  artists: Franca Bartholomäi, Tremezza von Brentano, Nezaket Ekici, Mane Hellenthal, Margareta Hesse, Verena Kyselka, Ute Lindner, Anja Luithle, Alice Musiol, Eva von PlatenHallermund, Sibylle Prange, Vera Röhm, Christine Rusche, Heike Ruschmeyer, Corinna Schnitt, Uta Schotten, Rose Stach, Melanie Wiora, Uta Zaumseil.