Publications

The political photomontages and collaged book covers of John Heartfield (1891–1968) have their origins in Berlin Dada. With gripping imagery and trenchant humour, the artist fought against war and Fascism, using works whose explosive power has lost none of its impact today. Like his animated films and theatre work, they are discussed in the context of his own and others' artworks, as well as the archive materials and images he collected. Supplemented by contemporary artists' statements.

How about a bit more? DEWAG was a state-run agency in the GDR responsible for both political communication and product advertising. Twelve new designs of the 1950s and 1960s from the poster collection of the Akademie der Künste, accompanied by short texts by Matthias Biskupek, inform the public about harvest festivals, healthy nutrition, tights and “cute summer sandals”.

Paul Holz (1883–1938) was one of the most exceptional German illustrators of the 20th century. Nevertheless, he was denounced as "degenerate" after 1933 and has only gained increasing appreciation since 1990. To commemorate of the 80th anniversary of his death, the catalogue presents all works in the possession of Kunstforum Ostdeutsche Galerie in Regensburg, as well as outstanding drawings from the Akademie der Künste, whose art collection is home to the most extensive collection of works by Paul Holz.

Winter Service, "Haferkakao" (oat cocoa), Baltic Sea Week and Tanning Cream! In the 1950s, design and advertising content were as varied as the product range of the planned economy was manageable. Twelve more motifs from the poster collection of the Akademie der Künste with short texts by Matthias Biskupek offer insights into the world of GDR advertising graphics.

The controlled economy of the GDR advertised a straightforward range of products in surprising, ingenious and effective ways. Twelve colourful motifs from the Akademie der Künste’s poster collection offer insights into the wonderful, funny and effective world of GDR advertising from the 1950s. With short texts by Matthias Biskupek.

Painter and graphic artist Alice Lex-Nerlinger belonged to the artistic and political avant-garde in the Weimar Republic. She became famous for her work §218 (1931) attacking the law on banning abortion. Influenced by "Der Sturm" gallery's circle of artists, she started to work with modern techniques such as photography, montage and photograms. The catalogue for the exhibition in Das Verborgene Museum contains many documents and illustrations from the artist’s estate now in the Akademie der Künste Archive and art collection.

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